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The following sample maps include some I crafted to illustrate available style choices, and others that I created for Wikipedia or commercial clients. With the exception of the free Wikipedia maps of Gettysburg and Jackson's Valley Campaign, all the following maps are © 2014, Hal Jespersen, All rights reserved.

Some of the following maps contain color elements. These were created using the RGB color model for computer screen display. When printed, the colors may appear very slightly different. For work destined to be printed, either the CMYK or grayscale color models will be used. All of the thumbnails shown below (and the full-size versions you will get if you click on them) are in the PNG format, which is convenient for website viewing. For professional publication, the TIFF format is usually used.

The first six maps that follow show a portion of the action at Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. The view is identical for each map, but different style choices are illustrated. As I indicate in the comment, the style choices for this small battlefield area will not be the same as for wide area, campaign or theater maps. Please review later samples for better renditions of these larger areas.


 


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Sample 1: First is a map with schematic terrain features (contour lines and colored contour areas) in color. This style works well for very detailed actions, and particularly when wooded areas, orchards, and marshes are included. However, this style is used relatively rarely because (1) color printing is not common and (2) the shaded relief styles, such as Sample 4 below, are often superior.

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Sample 2: Schematic terrain features in black-and-white. Sample 6 is probably a better style for this particular terrain, which because of the steep Round Top requires too many shades of gray to show accurately.

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Sample 3: Shaded relief in color, without contour lines. Sample 4 is probably a better style for this particular terrain. Color shaded relief (without contour lines) is the best bet for wide area, campaign or theater maps.

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Sample 4: Shaded relief in color, with contour lines. This is particularly effective for small areas like this, and is the best rendition of this small battlefield in color.

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Sample 5: Shaded relief in black-and-white, without contour lines. This style works best for wide area, campaign or theater maps. Sample 6, with contour lines, is a superior way to show a small battlefield like this because the hills have better definition.

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Sample 6: Shaded relief in black-and-white, with contour lines. I think this is the best rendition of this small battlefield in black and white.

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Sample 7: This is a free Wikipedia map with schematic topography. This style of topography is a little different than some of the preceding examples in that explicit contour line boundaries are not shown. Since there are so few elevations depicted in this map, I chose to omit the contour lines and placed the elevations into the map's legend. I may redo this Wikipedia map someday to include the contour lines because I think they add value without obscuring the other information on the map.

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Sample 8: Free Wikipedia map using shaded relief. There are only a handful of my Wikipedia maps that use this technique currently, but over time I will start updating many of the wide-area campaign maps to use this style. note that I chose in this map to show each state with slightly different colors. An alternative choice is to depict the tree cover over the wide area, but that is not something that can be done with the different state colorings.

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Sample 9: Black-and-white map with schematic topography, produced for Jim Knight’s Battle of Pea Ridge, History Press, 2012. We chose to use the schematic terrain because many of the fine details of the units (cannons, for instance) would have been difficult to discern on a gray shaded relief background, although my more recent map techniques have gotten around this problem. Other maps for this book cover a much wider area and are done as shaded relief.

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Sample 10: Black-and-white map with shaded relief topography, produced for Scott Mingus’s Gettysburg’s Controversial Old Confederate General: Governor William “Extra Billy” Smith of Virginia, Savas-Beatie, 2012.

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Sample 11: Black-and-white map with shaded relief topography, produced for Lance Herdegen's The Iron Brigade in Civil War and Memory: The Black Hats from Bull Run to Appomattox and Thereafter, Savas-Beatie 2012. (This background looks a little finer than the others because the USGS has elevation data available at 1/9th arc-second resolution for southern Pennsylvania, vs. the 1/3rd arc-sec for most other battlefields; this is roughly 3m resolution vs. 10m. For wider-area campaign maps, I often use 3 arc-sec SRTM data.)

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A review in Civil War News stated "The individual, human ordeal of the battlefield is as much a part of Herdegen’s story as the charging arrows and flanking columns depicted on the many brilliant maps accompanying the text. "

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Sample 12: Black-and-white map with shaded relief topography, produced for Gateway to the Confederacy: New Perspectives on the Chickamauga and Chattanooga Campaigns, 1862–1863, Evan Jones and Wiley Sword, editors, expected publication in 2014.

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Sample 13: Black-and-white map with shaded relief topography, produced for David Mowery's Morgan's Great Raid: The Remarkable Expedition from Kentucky to Ohio, published by the History Press in March 2013. This is one of 25 maps I drew for David!

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A recent book review (Civil War Books and Authors blog) says "The 25 maps, alone worth the price of the book, are works of art in addition to offering all the features that demanding readers desire."

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Sample 14: This area map for Katie Aldridge’s No Freedom Shrieker; The Civil War Letters of Union Soldier Charles Biddlecom, Paramount Marketing Press, 2011, shows key locations of the soldier’s campaigning in 1864–65. (This was my first published map after Wikipedia!)

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Sample 15: This map from Thompson’s Tourtellottes and the Civil War, by Joseph Lindley of the Thompson, Connecticut Historical Society, 2012, shows some non-US work, even though it is somewhat related to the Civil War.

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Sample 16: This map from the forthcoming Forward My Brave Boys! Forward! A History of the 11th Tennessee Infantry C.S.A., by Todd Cathey. It shows a portion of the Battle of Missionary Ridge, and is a good example of the schematic terrain style in black-and-white.

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Sample 17: Another map from Todd Cathey's book, showing the assault on the Dead Angle, Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, also using the schematic terrain style.

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Sample 18: This map is an example of how one my free Wikipedia maps (see the original) can be converted to the shaded relief style. It was converted for an article in Georgia Backroads magazine.

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Sample 19: This map is a shaded relief in black-and-white map of a portion of the Third Battle of Winchester, created as part of a 22-map series for Scott Patchan's The Last Battle of Winchester, published by Savas Beatie in 2013.

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Sample 20: This map was created as part of a series for a Civil War Roundtable PowerPoint presentation on the Third Battle of Winchester.

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Sample 21: This map is for a driving tour of Hood's Tennessee campaign, so it shows the modern road and rail networks, rather than the 19th century features. Schematic topography, rather than shaded relief, was chosen to match other maps in the series.

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Sample 22: This map is for Chancellorsville’s Forgotten Front: The Battles of Second Fredericksburg and Salem Church, May 3, 1863, by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White, published by Savas Beatie in June 2013.

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Sample 23: This map is a black-and-white conversion from one of my free Wikipedia maps (see the original), for John Hoptak's Confrontation At Gettysburg: A Nation Saved, A Cause Lost, published by the History Press in 2013.

A review in the Civil War Librarian blog said "Maps by Hal Jespersen ... are distinguished by precision and clarity."

Sample 24: This map is one of 46 I drew for Grant Rising, my collaborative effort with Jim Knight and Dana Lombardy to produce a full-color atlas of the battles of Ulysses S. Grant through the end of 1862. Click on here to read a description and order your own copy.

 

 

Clicking on the map thumbnail above will download a PDF file with a few sample pages.

Sample 25: This map of Sherman's campaign through North Carolina is for Eugene Schmiel's forthcoming book, Citizen-General: Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era.

 

Sample 26: This map of the battle of Fisher's Hill is for the book by Daniel T. Davis and Philip S. Greenwalt, Bloody Autumn: The Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864, published by Savas Beatie.

In a recent online review, James Durney wrote, "Hal Jespersen’s maps are an invaluable asset for any book. Expecting excellence, it is easy to overlook what great maps he does."

Sample 27: This map is from the book by Doug Crenshaw, Fort Harrison and the Battle of Chaffin's Farm: To Surprise and Capture Richmond, published bythe History Press.